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. >> in europe, google faces anti-competition measures. >>> in the united states, ben bernanke gets ready to outline an exit strategy to a skeptical congress. >> a warm welcome to "worldwide exchange." i'm chloe cho in asia. it's just past 5:00 p.m. in singapore. let's check on where the asian markets are wrapping up the trading day. mostly weaker today on the back of weaker consumer confidence numbers. and toyota lows taking the nikkei lower by 1.5%. the hang seng off 0.75%. on the other hand, we have the shanghai composite erasing all of its earlier losses, pushing higher by 1.3%. a lot of speculation in small cap stops and what may be linked to the national people's congress set to kick off next friday. other markets are weaker, the kospi down 1%. the bombay sensex has been trading around the front line. the aussie market asterisk comes off the table, a lot of commodities and resources lower. the s&p/asx 200 down .5%. let's check on the ftse cnbc global 300. slightly off 0.4% at 4,315. good morning, becky. >> good morning. it's about 10:00 on the continent. european markets have been t
. >> in the united states, the spotlight shines today, ben bernanke is back on the hill and president obama's high profile health care summit. >> hello there. a warm welcome to "worldwide exchange." it's chloe cho in asia where it's just past 5:00 p.m. in singapore. a similar scene that we saw as yesterday, of course, investors picking up on bernanke's comments. going forward, could be weak. of course, we had some weak housing numbers, as well, along with disappointing consumer confidence this week. take a look at the damage report. the yen is not helping. nor are the toyota woes. the hang seng, slightly off the shanghai composite. we did have the auction yield on three-month bills along with one-year bills earlier this week that left those yields unchanged. a lot of investors seem to be thinking that perhaps this could be a sign the pboc is taking it easy as far as tightening is concerned. as for the other markets, the kospi down 1.6%. the bombay sensex is pretty much right along the flat line and the aussie market lower by 1.2%, back below that key 4,600 level and take a look at the ftse cnbc gl
, will they or won't they? the bailout chatter for greece intensifies. >> and here in the united states, ben bernanke will set out the fed's exit plan today but will likely make jobs clear, we'll still be in the car for some time to come. >> and welcome to "worldwide exchange." i'm christine tan in singapore where it's 5:00 p.m. in the city. let's get a view of where the asian markets have closed today. a lot of hopes pengd on the european union. they might come up with a plan to bail out greece. the nikkei 225 is up marginally. toyota continues to be focused. that stock climbing despite anal announcement that it's recalling another set of cars. the shanghai market up more than 1%. a lot of positive comments out in the country about strong import data and export data and that's helping to lift sentiment in china. the kos pit is moving up flat. people and investors are staying on the sidelines. the bombay sensex is trading down 0.5% and the aussie market is pretty much flat, up 0.2%. the ftse cnbc global 300 up 8 points, 4,243. ross, good to see you. >> hey, christine. we're very much focused on the w
, as well, and nursing losses from the federal reserve chief ben bernanke. we've got all the details. christine, we're waiting for the timing. >> that's right. let's see the properties expect of a package for gooes, is it having any impact on the euro right now? euro/dollar, 1.3763. euro is higher against sterling, 0.8841. euro/dollar 1.3763. dollar/yen, standing at 90 evening. a lot of eyes on what will happen with the package. nicole. >> the snowstorm may gone in the i'd, but it's reeking havoc in the east coast, especially in washington. government offices are closed for a fourth straight day at the estimated cost of $100 million in lost productivity. the senate will be back in session this afternoon, but no votes are scheduled. the weekly u.s. inventory data which normally comes out on wednesday has been postponed again until friday. january retail sales in december business inventories which were supposed to come out today have moved to friday. we still get weekly jobless claims at 8:30 new york time and they're forecast to drop by 12,000 to a total of had 68,000. >>> pepsi corp
? >> a lot of speculation about the ecb and real quickly, i just want to mention that the bernanke hearing for tomorrow has been postponed. the expectation is that that is related to weather issues, of course. we've got a big storm coming our way here on the east coast. in the meantime we're looking at a market that's been up triple digits. up 99 and 100 as i speak and this is primarily because there is hope that, in fact, greece's problems may be somewhat tempered by the european union coming in and doing some kind of rescue, some kind of bailout. i want to bring in bob pisani. we've got a lot to talk about, bob. first, bernanke hearing. >> it's just because of the snow, there's nothing else going on. it's that simple and that makes a lot of sense and that's what traders have been saying and we're waiting for an official reason. >> mr. trichet is on his way back from sydney as we speak a day early and a lot of people are putting their hopes on him coming forward with some kind of plan. >> it's actually moved the markets. remember in '92 with the treat they created the whole euro, and gree
on a bailout for the debt-strapped country. >>> on exit strategy, ben bernanke unveiling his plan for the fed's next move. and the house of mouse, disney posting strong quarterly results and investors are responding. a cnbc exclusive with ceo bob ieger, "squawk box" begins right now. >> good morning, everybody. welcome to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm becky quick. joe and carl are out today. steve liesman is spending the week on set with me and this morning we are joined by "fortune" magazine editor andy soerwer. >> good to be here. >> meantime, wall street is bracing for a winter storm this morning as the second snowstorm in a week descend eds on new york. washington, philadelphia, they are expected to be hit and hit hard. the federal government in washington is closed for a third straight day at an estimated cost of $100 million in lust productivity. government offices in boston, baltimore and philadelphia all announcing that they will be closed. congress, by the way, is canceling votes and rescheduling hearings. the united nations headquarters in new york city shutting down schools all th
by a blueprint coming out from bernanke this week on a plan for credit tightening? >> now, you know, this is the usual thing, nicole, bernanke will come out and he'll have to be careful what he says. he has been saying we'll have an exit policy but not yet. exit policy means look at my finger. higher interest rates. it's like saying the market correctors. was it wrong before? the exit policy is when we're going to see higher interest rates in the united states and of course the markets right now don't want to hear about that. bernanke is saying when the time is appropriate will include interest rates because the markets will want to know when is the appropriate time. can you spell out what's going to happen? the problem is guess what? we're having low unemployment so what if we have low unemployment the month after that? will that be the appropriate signal? >> there we go. andrew freris to stay with us. we'll get you some headlines making news right now. meanwhile, around the world, in the united states, the head of the world's largest bond fund says 2010 will be a year of sovereign
was widely expected. ben bernanke came out last week saying a hike was coming, but many economists thought that the fed would at least wait until the next policy meeting next month. and in its statement, the fed says that the economic outlook does remain the same, reiterating that the benchmark rate will sustain for a period and that was echoed by the atlanta fed president, st. louis fed president and fed funds futures are pricing in a 25% chance of a rate hike by the end of the year. checking shares of u.s. bank in frankfurt, down across the board with citi lower, 1.4%. morgan stanley down 2.7%. ross. >> yeah. meanwhile, nicole, european stock markets ahead of the u.s. open, they've short of taken it mostly in their stride. we've had a sunny bit of green on the board this morning. we've dipped down slightly, off about .25% for the ftse 100. a little more for the german and french markets. smi, as we heard earlier, really good numbers from nestle, talking about growth in asia, so doing all the sort of things that james bev aan next to me likes. and the dollar has come off the highs on the
. people like alan greenspan and ben bernanke gave us the largest downturn since the great depression. that is why we have a huge budget deficit. we didn't have a huge tax cuts. we had stimulus and response to the downturn. we have higher unemployment if we have not had that but let's be clear if we are upset about the deficit greenspan and bernanke, i don't know why we reappointed bernanke. in terms of the entitlement programs, yeah we have a public pension program, which is hugely popular. you look at polling day that-- i was at a conference this morning in social security is over 90%. they ask people would you be willing to pay higher taxes to sustain sosa security benefits and 70 to 80% said yes. i don't see any problem with running a pension program through the public sector. what is the problem with the? it is usually popular. health care costs, medicare again. we are providing medicare health care benefits for seniors. that is also hugely popular. you have these tea party people out there yelling don't let the government touch medicare. they are anti-government but they want me
me, i'm chaled. >> and what are you expecting to hear from bernanke on capitol hill tomorrow? you say restraint is needed. why and when? >> well, you know, the reason i think that restraint is needed is because i think that he may be getting a little bit behind the curve. the reason i say that is a lot of the so-called leading indicators of inflation, my work, suggested inflation in 2010 is going to be higher than the consensus expectation. so the consensus expects inflation to be around 2%. i think it could be over 3% in 2010. and i think bernanke needs to start move towards restraint, in other words, start to move towards some of the excess liquidity driving this inflation. so i think sooner as opposed to later. i actually think that if he starts to move towards restraint wibt might lead to an increase in bank lending, which is sorely acting. but nevertheless, i think he needs to move towards restraint sooner than the consensus believes, not later. >> that's what i wanted to ask you about. we're getting comments in from the fed's bill dudley who says small banks are fuelling the pre
. >> people orchestrated the bailout and ben bernanke and others says this makes them sick and it's what they hated the most. >> if you don't get the "fox business" network, you should demand it. so says neil cavuto. >> shepard: word of a rough standoff in the town of mccomb, illinois. it appears what's happened is a gunman is in a farm king store, which i'm told is a supermarket. and he's been shooting up the place. it's apparently, according to the reports from mccomb, illinois, north and west of the capital, two people may be dead. is that true? two people shot. my bad. we don't know their status. we know a couple people have been shot. people came out of the store crying and the s.w.a.t. team is there. the local reporter heard shots fired again. two farm king employees are hold up in an -- holed up in the office and eyewitness told the local tv the police, fire and ambulance crew are on the scene. the shooting is taking place now according to authorities. i just -- we have no idea who is doing the shooting and why these employees are holed up in the place. but we're getting crews fro
concerns that the market has across the spectrum. and you've got bernanke talking about higher rates. fed funds are pricing in almost 100% probability that we have rates lower in march. if we start to see more rhetoric out of the fed with respect to what they're going to do with the rates, that is outside of market expectations right now currently. >> what are you telling people tow to do snt. >> right now, volt tilt is at a level to finance shorter purchases and hedges. given the uncertainty, i don't think it's fair to say that volatility is expensive on the front end. >> anthony, real quick, berna e bernanke's exit strategy speech yesterday, does it move up your sense of the timing for when the fed will ultimately tighten? >> it really didn't, steve. the federal reserve basically injected $1.5 trillion in the liquidity in the credit crisis. it would be irresponsibility of the fed to not outline a credit strategy. i think he made it very clear that he wanted to give us the thumb nails strategy of what this is going to be like. is he going to normalize the discount rate? yes. but remembe
and for the communities of america. host: ben bernanke cautioned senators not to curtail the fed's banking oversight, referring to short-term political liability for this. guest: i think he is absolutely correct. people tend, under these kinds of conditions, to want to blame someone. the problem with that is there are plenty of people to blame. we deregulated the industry. congress deregulated the industry. there was a culture, if you will, of deregulation, and this encouraged some speculative activities that led to the bubbles and then the collapse. yes, you have this reaction. i think it is an overreaction. i think the outcome would be -- as you try to blame someone, you get worse outcomes instead of better outcomes. i think that is what the chairman was communicating. it is certainly my message. host: senate banking committee -- are the right to be angry at the fed at all? guest: if they are going to be angry, they have to be angry at everyone, including themselves. they asked to eliminate glass-segall, which allowed these agencies to get better. the regulation backed off, if you will. in that ki
that of course was going to burst, and this is why i get mad at people like alan greenspan and ben bernanke and most economists because god knows what on earth was going through their heads in the year 2003 to those of four cardinals five, 2006, to dozens of as the bubble could growing and growing and the savitt is okay and now they are surprised who could have known that is the joke we have or not washington they run around saying who could have known? anyone doing their job should have known. >> host: amity shlaes, anything you want to address? >> guest: i think it's important of the interplay and the war and domestic policy because when you have -- it's true the government can't think about two things at once. it can't walk and chew gum at the same time and when you have a distraction whether you believe it's something we should invest in, afghanistan, iraq or not the government doesn't think well what is going on at home so if he would have called on our various leaders at the fed or the white house over time under -- in this purpose it would be under president bush postsecondary 11th h
, and if the government pulls back too fast, if bernanke pulls back too fast or if the executive congressional branches pull back too fast, there is a question whether it would worsen things, i think that's legitimate. what i do believe you can put into place trigger mechanisms on medicare reforms, on medicaid reforms, on social security reforms, so that these things are in law and they're not just sort in imagination. it's hard, as you know, nor invei for investors to have much confidence in the future of the nation's finances when there's nothing and it's just talk and we're just continuing to talk. >> on that very point, there was a new report on rising life expectancy, which is a great thing, a great triumph of human medicine, but, you know, why don't we talk about raising the retirement age for medicare and social security gradually over the next 20, 30 years. it would save a lot of money. >> that's going to be a big discussion that we'll be having on this show very regularly, and we'll call on both of you to do it again, david gergen, cnn analyst, and stephen moore, "wall street journal" writer.
for the u.s. in 2 1/2 years at around 0.5%. and looking at what bernanke said this week, gave us a laundry list of ways to exit the strategy, basically, and he basically talked about, you know, the possibility of increasing interests on bank reserves. and while in basically contrast, the ecb is not going to do the exit strategy. it's going to stay in and maybe in too deep right now as it may need to provide some liquidity out of what happened from greece. so that will definitely give the yield luster for the u.s. dollar. >> so what target would you put on euro/dollar? >> still looking at 1.32% before the end of the quarter. any bounce, really, is going to be more of the corrective bounce, not more than 1.3950. >> i was wondering, what do you see the likelihood of a new and increased quantitative easing effort by the ecb, either in a direct like we've seen in the u.s. or uk and a continuation of the currency? >> look, even though they said they are not going to provide renewed 12-month loan facility, the ecb, this institution that has been seen as one of the first institutions to get out of
in place. we had hank, ben bernanke tim geithner and sheila bair the head of the fdic. i know a lot of people in finance and a lot of people in business and government. and i can't think of for that would have done a better job of getting us through that. now it's kind of fashionable to look back and pick at one aspect or another of what was happening and our country's financial system froze up during that period. some of you in this room were at a party i was at in september of 2008, one to talk was the money market funds saved. if we have 3.5 trillion fun missile by 30 million people who on is and they might are worrying about whether they can get their money that was half of all the process held by u.s. banks at the time you have a panic. you had commercial paper frees up entirely in the biggest companies of the united states and some are described in this book that worried whether they were going to meet their payroll and a short period of time to read the sixth largest bank in the country in terms of the domestic deposits, washington mutual failed over a weekend. you had the th
closed yesterday. investors did have time to digest the news. the chairman of the fed ben bernanke basically telegraphed all this. he said that he was going to essentially be pushing up rates, tightening policy last week when he spoke before congress. analysts say the increase in the increase rate indicates that the fed is winding down a series of extraordinary programs it put in place to ease the economic crisis. so, in other words, the crisis is over. the rate increase is not going to directly affect borrowing costs for consumers and most businesses, but, as you see, it's putting the stock market under a little bit of pressure. right now we've got the dow off a little more than 27 points. also under pressure, shares of dell, the computer giant, reported disappointing fourth quarter earnings. sales rose during the holiday season, but those sales were cropped up by steep discounts that did cut into the company's bottom line. finally, well, the saints came marching in to the nyse this morning. three members of the super bowl champion new orlean saints rang that opening bell, looks l
decades. he made money too cheap. a lot of people want to put bernanke on mt. rushmore because he's making money cheap and guiding us through this crisis. >> it does raise us to this issue. rates were so low under alan greenspan was part of the problem and then we had this giant bubble and the bubble burst. instead of letting the bubble go back to flat we've been huffing and puffing by printing more money and trying to help everybody and make it easier to try to keep it inflated a little bit. it has so many holes in it will go down here at some point. >> you're right. all right. international superstar erin burnett. how many points exactly is the market going to go up m. >> i hate this. >> we'll see if it turns around by the end of the day. we'll have a lower open. i'll make it up. up plus 30. >> wrong. up 72. erin burnett, thank you. >> have a good weekend, guys. >> that's all i got. thank you for being with us, erin. that $100 that you have, it's worth about $72 now. >> mika stole it back. typical democrat taking your money. >> she's liberal. all right. coming up, new overnight developme
not remember this because we probably didn't keep track of everything that paulson and bernanke and george bush did, but lehman falls on september 15, then what we have is on september 23 the chairman of the federal reserve and the secretary of treasury come into congress and they testify that they need $700 billion, they've got a 2 1/2-page bill, they don't know what they're going to do with the money, but if you don't give it to them then the world is going to end. now that makes you a little currentble if you're deciding what you're going to do with your investments. not only that, but the next day the president of the united states comes on national television and says the following, speak to the american people, just to get them, you know, calm down a little bit, he says, financial assets related to home mortgages have lost value during the housing decline and the banks holding these assets are are restricted credit. as a result our entire economy is in danger. so i propose that the federal government reduce the risk posed by these troubled assets and supply urgently needed money so banks
together with bernanke's exit speech, you put that together and people say, wait a second, maybe the tight is turning. and being on top of the timing of when the fed starts to tighten or when the rhetoric changes, because when the rhetoric changes, that's when rates will change. and if there weren't enough international news, the european central bank plans to join forces of the european commission to monitor the situation in greece. ecb president jean-claude trichet says the two will draw up necessary measures to maintain stability in the euro zone. european officials offered support for debt-laden greece at a summit yesterday. we don't know what's in the plan. it's some sort of support. >> i don't know what the plan is. except everybody is happy they're in a plan. >> they're in something. they've expressed support. >> monday, the finance ministers meet again. this may be a situation where you see more of the details that start to emerge. what's it call, the european -- the meeting on monday. >> what worries me is that the plan itself will be so underwell manying that people will say, is
it on the bernanke excuse stroke reason. we saw it in particular on heavy volume last friday and this is not really -- is this not really a market where really the chick ents are coming home to roost, bid up on a lot of artificial liquidity and is systematically now deleveraging? >> i tend to agree long term i'm very bullish. we have been through a tremendous recession worldwide and now we're just seeing reel it budding stages of a new economic expansion. we're not out of the woods yet but a lot better than six months ago. >> i'm not sure you can agree with me and be bullish. if you have systematic deleveraging this market is going to go down and down surely if that is true. >> i don't really think that the market -- >> surely if that is the reasoning then this is not good news for sometime. >> well, again, we view the world from a financial planning perspective. if you're a trader, you've got this risk on, then you're at risk with short-term money. long-term money viewing from a financial planning perspective, we've been building cash, we've been defensive for quite a while, and our main goal with
bernanke is in, senator. >> yes, he is. >> that's all right with you, though. you're going to be okay, right? >> i'm going to be okay. i offer my congratulations. but i think it does accepted a message to be confirmed by the lowest margin in history, sends a message about the concern about the role he played and the build-up to the crisis. >> yeah, but senator, you were ready to take the other side, knowing he would get confirmed, and your constituents can still say, well, at least this senator took the populus side. took the. >> i took the position as the only democrat taking that position after a careful review of the things he stood for, alignment with greenspan, failure to resfond derivatives. the failure on consumer protection, the things you are talking about in terms of prepayment penalties and liar loans and so i think he failed on many fronts but he is there now and i hope he does a great job on monetary policy and gets consumer protection in an agency that will care about it. >> senator, thanks. you have to keep coming back. >> thank you. >> oregon, oregon. i know how to say
might not remember this because we probably didn't keep track of everything that paulson and bernanke and george bush did, but lehman falls on september 15. then what we have on september 23, the chairman of the federal reserve and the secretary of treasury come into congress and they testify that they need $700 billion. they have a 2 1/2-page bill. they don't know what they're going to do with the money. but if you don't give it to them, it's world is going to end. that makes you uncomfortable if you're deciding what to do with your investment. not only that, but the next day, the president of the united states comes on national television and says the following, speaking to the american people to get them calmed down a little bit. he said financial assets related to home mortgages have lost value during the housing decline and the banks holding these assets have restricted credit. as a result, our entire economy is in danger. so i propose that the federal government reduce the risk posed by these trouble assets and supply urgently needed money so banks and other financial institutio
and country and dodge grand caravan vehicles. >>> well, fed chairman ben bernanke told congress wednesday that interest rates will remain low to support continued economic growth. >>> and the house is now set to vote on a jobs bill after the full senate passed the $15 billion measure on wednesday. >>> and just today after being released from a washington, d.c., hospital after suffering a heart attack, former vice president dick cheney is having coffee today with his former boss, president george w. bush. it is the first time the two have seen each other since they left office. >>> and a close call this week for an officer in michigan who was on the side of the road with a driver when another car came barreling towards him. he managed to jump to avoid being pinned, and amazingly, suffered only minor injuries. it is 7:15. let's head back now to matt, meredith, ann and al. >> all right, thanks, amy. >> seems like we've got just nasty weather across the whole continent. >> that's right. >> snowing and nasty in the northeast. >> but it just stopped here. >> and that's not the only place. we've
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25